In His Hands

2 Oct
My granddaughters were getting ready for school, but the oldest one—the almost-ten-year-old one—lingered over her breakfast. Something rolled around in her mind. In time she expressed what troubled her. I hate it when I can’t come up with a simple solution for her. She and her sisters face things that seem unfair, too big for their too young lives. Then a thought captured my attention. I told her in a simple wording what she has been learning in church and as we have talked around the house. I said, “I don’t know what today holds, but I know Who holds today.” She smiled and nodded. I can’t take much credit for coming up with that phrase. I’ve heard versions of it over the years. My grandmother played the piano and sang duets with a neighbor of hers in their church. One of the songs in her old hymn book she said was her favorite. The words of the chorus are: “Many things about tomorrow I don’t seem to understand But I know who holds tomorrow And I know who holds my hand.” I learned to play the notes of the song with my right hand on her piano. I never thought I could control both hand and the pedals at the same time, so I satisfied myself with the two-part harmony only. Every time I visited her I would open her hymn book to the right page and play her favorite hymn. The words became etched in my mental file card. Since then I have found many evidences in the Bible that the words of the song are very true. Psalm 31, for example, says, “But as for me, I trust in You, O LORD, I say, ‘You are my God.’ My times are in Your hand;” David wrote those words during times of great distress and need. I reflected on these words and applied them to the turmoil in our own lives I smiled and nodded.

One Response to “In His Hands”

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Glad Jesus Is in Control | Boosterclub Blog -

    […] blogs about how the need to be in control has slowed my development of a full Christian life. (See In His Hands, Let Me Drive, and Trying to Play It Safe with God if you want to read or review them). Last Friday […]

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